Rules and regulations: Kitchen Maintenance


When it comes to keeping your kitchen in good condition, it’s important to adhere to both mandatory maintenance and good practice. Here, we outline a few key points to consider to keep your church kitchen fit for practice – and to recognise when it’s no longer cutting the mustard.

Health & Safety
What you legally have to do to keep your church kitchen up to Health & Safety codes depends on what it is used for, but any kitchen serving food to the public (or a congregation) should maintain certain health & safety standards as good practice. Basic hygiene protocols should be adhered to whether or not your kitchen needs to be registered with a local health authority, which is why a semi-commercial kitchen is such a good choice for church buildings: they’re easier to clean and maintain. Find out more here: http://www.steelplankitchens.co.uk/news-rules-and-regulations-health-and-safety.php

PAT testing
It’s not actually compulsory to have your electrical goods tested every year, but the law does state that you need to maintain and electrical equipment in good working order. Take a good look at your kitchen appliances and gadgets and if they have seen better days, it might be worth getting them PAT tested by a professional. Alternatively, you might want to look into replacing them as part of renovations. This provides a helpful overview of electrical safety in your church kitchen: http://www.steelplankitchens.co.uk/news-keep-your-kitchen-electricals-safe-this-christmas.php

Fire safety
We all know that fire alarms need to be tested regularly, but did you know that fire extinguishers also need to be checked by a professional at least once a year? Sign up with a local fire safety firm that can conduct annual maintenance. You can read more in our short guide to fire safety here: http://www.steelplankitchens.co.uk/news-rules-and-regulations-fire-safety.php

Hazardous substances
If you’re church kitchen is getting on a bit, you might want to have it checked for hazardous substances. Lead pipes were once commonplace, and asbestos – which was widely used in post-war building – can still be found in church halls and lean-to’s built in the 1940s-50s and is particularly dangerous if building work is about to be carried out. If you are having renovations carried out, your builder should be able to offer you advice before work begins.


If you’re planning a new kitchen for your church, Steelplan Kitchens offer a free consultation and design process to help you get the best solution for your church. Call us on 0844 809 9186.


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